Practice- Led Research

Digital Story Website

Digital Story Proposal Website

Social Media Profiles:     Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube

The Issue: Brand Considerations

An issue that concerned me during the digital story project was our choice of platform. From the very beginning, we were set on making a web documentary series on YouTube, where the first episode would be our 90-second video on the penalty rate cut. As things turned out, we ended up adjusting our whole approach to the assignment and made a website that would function as our new platform. We leaned more towards the direction of Vice Magazine and our concept went from being a web series to becoming a news site.

When you upload to YouTube, you can’t control the perception the consumer has of your brand. Often, “related videos” will show your competitors, and the YouTube logo will always be on your video player. Related videos shown after your video ends may lead traffic to a competitor’s site instead of your company’s. There’s really no unique branding available on the YouTube platform unless you spend a lot of money to become a Partner, and even then you’ll have to deal with ads in some form (Archer 2014).

Since the theme was cultural differences, all of a sudden it wasn´t only the penalty rate cut we had to worry about. After converting into a news site, we had to come up with more content about cultural differences.

The task of not just creating content, but creating content that resonates with your readers, is a critical but difficult task to master.

As Neil Patel writes content marketing is also about using the best tools out there to promote your valuable content, in order to attract and retain customers.

Therefore we´re also relying on our social media sites to promote our website to solve the issue.

References:

Archer, D. (2014). CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE: YouTube vs. Hosting on Your Own Site. Available: https://blogs.adobe.com/digitalmarketing/customer-experience/youtube-vs-hosting-site/. Last accessed 29th May 2017.

Patel, N. (-). How to Create Better Content For Your Customers. Available: http://neilpatel.com/blog/content-creation-how-to-create-better-content-for-your-customers/. Last accessed 28th May 2017.

Wainwright, C. (2012). How to Create Content That Actually Resonates With Your Readers. Available: https://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/33747/How-to-Create-Content-That-Actually-Resonates-With-Your-Readers.aspx#sm.00018nwhyzf3cd50rrz2mpmq0wzzo. Last accessed 29th May 2017.

 

 

 

 

 

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Digital Story: Peer Review

Musicorum

A good concept where they play one song to a bunch of people with different nationalities. Many people, many opinions and so little time to tell it. The fast-paced editing and use of 2 shot were very impressive and it solved what could have been a problem with this type of reaction video. I liked how they played the song in the background while the people gave their answers. It saved time but it also gave it a better overall feeling. The only thing I would pick on that really annoyed me while watching this clip was the bright red face on the poster positioned right behind the interviewees. It draws the attention away from the actual focus. I would suggest running the background through PS and colour grade, maybe even manipulate the bright red to make it less `out there´. Except that, my opinion is that the group has done very well.

 

With Children

This project is about a child being bullied at school because she come from another country and she´s struggling with the English language. Absolutely heartbreaking and because the interviewee is a child it gets even more emotional. It´s a strong story. The fact that the interview is shot at the girls’ school could have raised some concerns since it involves children, but they´ve solved it well by not filming any of the other kids and still managed to make the visual work. What I am missing from this project is a strong social media strategy. From what I heard it´s being published in an Arabic newspaper. Bullying is a global problem and I believe ´With Children´ has the potential to reach a much broader audience if they use the power of Twitter, Facebook, Vimeo and YouTube for publishing.

 

Risky Business in the App Stores

 

percent-time-spent-on-mobile-apps-2016

Smartinsight: Percent time spent on mobile apps 2016.

 

The world is mobile and applications are for people on the go. Mobile apps have revolutionised the way we use our smartphones. These days we have an app for everything. In this post, I will discuss some of the risky sides of downloading mobile apps. I Myself have over 75 Apps on my iPhone. Most of them I´ve had for years and they are hardly ever used.

The number of apps continues to grow. As of March 2017, according to Statista, Android users were able to choose between 2.8 million apps while Apple’s App Store remained the second-largest app store with 2.2 million available apps.

“Applications for mobile platforms are being developed at a tremendous rate, but often without proper security implementation. Insecure mobile applications can cause serious information security and data privacy issues and can have severe repercussions on users and organisations alike.”

The mentality of the developers is to build more apps before the competitors build them. Security isn´t thought off.

“Application risk is increasing because we’re doing more and more applications on our devices,” – Chris Wysopal, CTO and Cofounder of Veracode.

Every time you´re adding an application to your device there´s a potential risk that the app either has malicious functionality with intend to trick you into downloading what you see but instead you´re getting something you didn´t ask for. It could also be a poorly coded app which leaks information because of the way it transfers and stores data in the clear and sends your private information up to an add network. The developer thinks they´re doing a good job, but they´re actually putting your data at risk, Wysopal goes on.

If the developer doesn´t build the app correctly the operating system isn´t going to protect the user. In other words; all the data on your device, personal data, your address book, your photos etc. is at risk.

Apps shouldn´t be able to access contact information without disclosing it first with the user. When you download an App you agree to the terms and conditions to let the app access other parts of your phone. Have you ever asked yourself why a simple gaming or weather app needs access to your Wi-Fi, contact list or camera?

The more apps you add to you phone the higher risk you put yourself in.

After researching this topic it´s safe to say that the number of apps on my phone has rapidly decreased.

 

References: 
Jain, A.K. & Shanbhag, D.. (2012). Addressing Security and Privacy Risks in Mobile Applications. Available: https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/aa53/1e41c4c646285b522cf6f33f82a9d68d5062.pdf. Last accessed 23rd May 2017.

Spark, D. (2012). The Causes of Mobile Application Risk. Available: https://www.tripwire.com/state-of-security/security-data-protection/the-causes-of-mobile-application-risk/. Last accessed 24th May.

-. (2017). Number of apps available in leading app stores as of March 2017. Available: https://www.statista.com/statistics/276623/number-of-apps-available-in-leading-app-stores/. Last accessed 21st May 2017.

Security issues with IoT

 

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INTERNET OF THINGS BY PIXABAY

 

The Internet Of Things (IoT) refers to devices that collect and transmit data via the internet. But how does the IOT impact our security?

Anything that can be connected, will be connected. In 2008, there were already more objects connected to the internet than people. By 2020 there will be an estimated 50-200 billion connected devices,  According to Behmann & Wu.

Spamming is already a widely known problem on the Internet and could also affect the IoT. For example, criminals could change EPCs, so that tags point to banner ads instead of an ONS server, which would result in revenue for the spammer for each tag read (Weber & Weber 2010).

“As an industry, the IoT has failed to make it clear that if you put software on something attackable and connect it, it’s exposed. We have to aggressively and sanely excel the benefits of connected devices, while mitigating the risks. If we move too fast in developing new IoT applications, but don’t make security a paramount consideration, we’re leaving ourselves vulnerable for massive breaches with massive consequences.”

With billions of devices connected together security becomes a big issue.

The IoT holds great promise for cybercriminals who can use our homes´ routers, televisions, refrigerators, and other Internet-connected devices to launch large and distributed attacks. Internet-enabled devices represent an enormous threat because they are easy to penetrate, consumers have little incentive to make them more secure, the rapidly growing number of devices can send malicious content almost undetected, few vendors are taking steps to protect against this threat, and the existing security model simply will not work to solve the problem (Behmann & Wu 2015). Do not buy devices which have default passwords. Once you connect the device is exposed on the internet so anyone could find an address to a machine and connect to it and do whatever they please.

All IoT devices should have authentication. The password needs to be unique for every device so only the owner can log into it. Every IoT device should use encryption while uploading to the cloud, sharing data etc. so only the people that are meant to are getting the information. Protect your privacy. we don´t want these IoT devices to reveal things about where they are or who the owner is and how long they´ve been running. That sort of information needs to be hidden so only the right people can see it.

Attacks launched using IoT devices

We´ve already heard stories of Malware which searches for IoT devices and tries to take them over. Why is it so simple to do this? Computers have built-in security features, they have firewalls and antiviruses. But all these IoT devices have no security what so ever and most of them have a default access. In other words, the same set of password for all the devices from the manufacturer. If I buy a coffee maker and connect it to my Wi-Fi my new IoT device is exposed to the internet. Every IoT device has some sort of mini-computer inside it. Hackers are able to take over and use the device to launch DDoS attacks. Therefore, reasonable security measures need to be made.

 

References: 

Behmann, F & Wu, K (2015). Collaborative Internet of Things (C-IoT): For Future Smart Connected Life and Business. United Kingdom: John Wiley & Sons Ltd. 7-36.

Beaver, K & Rouse, M. (-). distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack. Available: http://searchsecurity.techtarget.com/definition/distributed-denial-of-service-attack. Last accessed 13th May 2017.

Hanson, J. (2015). Internet of Things Security Risks and Challenges. Available: https://www.pubnub.com/blog/2015-06-05-internet-of-things-security-risks-and-challenges/. Last accessed 11th May 2017.

Weber, R.H. & Weber , R (2010). Internet of Things Legal Perspectives . London, New York: Springer. 44.

-. (2016). DDoS Attack Against Dyn Managed DNS Incident Report for Dyn, Inc.. Available: https://www.dynstatus.com/incidents/nlr4yrr162t8. Last accessed 12th May 2017.

-. (-). Big Data and the Internet of Things. Available: https://www.infragistics.com/community/blogs/mobileman/archive/2015/12/15/big-data-and-the-internet-of-things.aspx. Last accessed 12th May 2017.

User Experience: The Power of Colour

The meaning and understanding of colours are different from culture to culture. This is written from a western-centric view.

As we are scrolling through websites we are searching for the next thing, by looking for something new to click.  Therefore, it´s important to make what´s clickable visible.  Krug writes “As we scan a page, we´re looking for a variety of visual cues that identify things as clickable- things like shape (buttons), location (in a menu bar, for instance), and formatting (colour and underlining).” No matter form or location it must be stressed; the colour plays a significant role.

“Use of color is extremely important in your marketing materials and especially your branding. Psychologists have noted that the impression from color can account for up to 60% of the decision to accept or reject a product or service.”

Designers spend a lot of time considering the different colour combinations used on their websites. The right combination appeals to the mass audience in a very pleasant manner. One can say that colours speak louder than words.

Emotions are associated with different colours. For instance, red is the most stimulating colour. Red represents determination, power, danger, passion, love etc. The colour brings text and images to the foreground and it stimulates people to make quick decisions (Fiore 2010). In other words; quicker purchases.

Also, consider the fact that 5 percent of women and 8 percent of men has some sort of colour blindness. The red/green colour blindness is the most common. Therefore it´s wise to use strong contrast red/green colours.

However you choose your design, do not underestimate the power of colour. Colour is used to improve web design and user experience. It´s used to impact emotion, draw attention and make visitors make purchases.

The colours used in a website should be based on the type of industry and the theme to make it more expressive. Colours interacting with each other can have a whole different meaning than single colours together. The use of right colours, coupled with the right use of designing and branding, can help your brand reach to the whole new levels of notoriety.

References: 

Brown, E. (2014). [INFOGRAPHIC]: Color your Brand Industry-wisely!. Available: https://www.designmantic.com/blog/color-your-brand-industry-wisely/. Last accessed 4th May 2017.

Fiore, A.M. (2010). Understanding Aesthetics for the Merchandising and Design Professional: The Elements and principles of Design. 2nd ed. New York: Fairchild Books. 164.

Krug, S (2014). Don’t Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability. America: New Riders. 36-37.

-. (-). Color Meaning. Available: http://www.color-wheel-pro.com/color-meaning.html. Last accessed 3rd May 2017.

-. (-). Colour Blindness. Available: http://www.colourblindawareness.org/colour-blindness/. Last accessed 10th May 2017.

-. (-). The Psychology of Color. Available: https://www.bizmarquee.com/the-psychology-of-color/. Last accessed 4th May 2017.

#7 Deconstructing The Diner Scene from Natural Born Killers

For this prompt, I will discuss and deconstruct the diner scene from one of my favourite movies Natural Born Killers, directed by Oliver Stone. NBK follows two messed up lovers, Mickey (Woody Harrelson) and Mallory Knox (Juliette Lewis), on a murder spree through America. It´s a psychotic satire of how the mass media romanticise and glorify serial killers.

In the diner scene, the camera tracks the characters at a canted angle and there´s constant floating Dutch angles. Throughout the entire movie, there not a single perfectly angled shot. Special effects used in the editorial technique such as repeated action and distorted faces is also seen throughout the film. The switch from black and white to colour gives a sense of parallel worlds. Reality and imagination. It could also represent a right versus wrong in how the media portrays serial killers.

The first scene is shot in colour outside the diner, with a high angle wide shot and Dutch-style angle tilting down. The truck breaking down might symbolise no escape. The music switches from Leonard Cohen´s ´waiting for the miracle´ to a more upbeat tone.

Wide shot zoomed into a medium wide shot from a low angle of the two rednecks entering the diner. The camera switches over to Mallory from the rednecks´ POV. She´s dancing in a Medium wide shot which zooms out a bit. Next shot is a MS from a low angle and Mallory dances out of the frame. The angle is canted in every scene. Next shot is in black and white. The Camera zooms out and back in from a MS to a close up in a Dutch angle. Mallory is still dancing and there is a lot of camera movement. Next frame switches back to colour and is a MS which zooms in on the rednecks checking out Mallory while making sleazy remarks. The rednecks face gets distorted before it cuts to next scene.

New frame the rednecks are walking towards the camera. A dirty over the shoulder with a Dutch tilt shot from behind the counter. Next frame takes us back to Mallory dancing. It´s a MS which zooms out a bit when one of the cowboys joins in on the dance. The angle is canted.

Next frame is a MCU of the other redneck sitting at the bar. The camera tracks out and to the right and stops at Mickey who is holding up a newspaper. We cannot see Mickey´s face which creates a sense of danger. At 00:48 one can read the front page of the newspaper “Mickey and Mallory Kill Six Teens During Slumber Party”.

demonZooms out to a MS where Mickeys face is revealed. The angle is tilted. Bright toxic green is contrasted against some of the action within the scene. The next shot is an extreme close-up of Mickey in black and white cut to a red filtered glow MS flashing glimpse of Mickey looking demonic covered in blood. Cuts back to a black and white close-up in slow-mo.

Cuts to a Dutch angled B/W CU of the redneck dancing. Cut to a MS of Mallory and the rednecks lower bodies where he is sexually harassing her. Next frame is a coloured high angle MS of the toxic green pie. cut to a tilted close-up of the jukebox, also toxic green. A cut between the pie and the jukebox. In the next shots one can see the toxic green colour of the key lime pie and the jukebox. Oliver Stone and cinematographer Robert Richardson used green in the film to denote sickness of the mind. It´s also seen in the drug store scene and in the prison riot.

Next shot a black and white close-up of the redneck laughing while swinging his beer in the air. Extreme close up of the record in the jukebox stops spinning. Cut back to black and white a wide MS of Mallory and the redneck. The music stops and there´s dialogue between the two rednecks commenting on Mallory.

Cut to a close-up colour shot of Mickey taking a bite of his pie. He seems to be following the situation closely. Next shot is black and white a dirty over the shoulder wide shot of Mallory and the redneck standing in front of her from Mickey´s POV.  She puts on a new record. Cut to a close-up colour shot of the jukebox.

Cut to a black and white mid-close up of the redneck taking a sip of his beer. Music starts playing “L7‘s Shit List” synced with him getting a bottle smashed in his face. Cut to a wide colour shot of Mallory hitting him in the face. Again and again.

Next shot a mid-close up of the redneck at the bar watching the fight taking a sip of his beer. Cut back to a canted wide shot of Mallory and the dancing redneck. Next shot is in black and white. A Dirty over the shoulder MS tracking Mallory into the next shot, still B/W where she keeps on hitting and screaming in a variety of unusual angles and close ups.

Next frame in colour a wide shot of Mallory beating the shit out of him. cut to an extreme close-up in B/W of Mickey following the situation closely.

Cut to a coloured Dutch tilted medium- wide shot of Mallory smashing a bottle in the redneck’s head. Next shot a close up of the waitress with a tired-of-this-shit look in her face. Cut back to Dutch tilted wide shot of the fight. Next frame is again B/W a canted close up of Mallory with a perfect cut to the next coloured wide shot of the fight. The colour and angles change wildly and rapidly throughout the scene. It´s a continuously shot which switched to a B/W MS when she kicks the redneck and he falls back towards the camera. The fight continues in B/W and there´s a lot of camera movement. Cuts to different MS shots with Dutch tilt and canted angles.

Cut to a colour shot of the other redneck drinking beer while eagerly watching the fight. Cut to a high angle B/W of the fight to an extreme close up to a low angle MS when she kicks him cuts to a coloured extreme close-up of blood being splattered on table and walls.

Next scene is a B/W medium-wide shot of Mickey and the redneck at the counter. Red neck gets up Mickey follows. The camera turns and the next shot is a low angle MS of the redneck calling Mickey a son of a bitch. Cuts to a MS dirty over the shoulder of Mickey and a sound of a knife slice.

Cut to low angled close up of the redneck cut to an extreme close-up of Mickey looking down. Next is a high angled colour shot of a bloody finger on the redneck´s shoe. Cuts to B/W eye level of foot shaking the finger off. Next frame is a close up of Mickey cuts to a low angled colour MS off Mickey going at him with the knife again. Black and white close of when he slits his throat and face.

Cut to a canted wide shot of the action in both fights. Cut to B/W close up of the waitress´ shocked face. Next scene is a low angled close up of Mickey and the redneck in colour cut to a canted moving B/W wide shot of the whole situation.

Next shot is also B/W a Dutch tilted long shot of Mickey facing the cook behind the counter. Next is a gunshot followed by the bullet´s POV Heading fast toward the cooks face. The audience is the weapon. The bullet stops a floats right in front of the cook´s eyes cut to MS of blood splashing up against the wall and a scream.

Cut to a CU of the redneck being pushed through the window. Mallory grabs him and drags him back in wide shot low angle she´s standing up screaming: “How sexy am I now?” Cut to eye-level MWS of Mickey.

Next a MS from Mickey´s POV of the third redneck standing outside looking in. Cut to Mickey. Dutch tilted shot of Mickey throwing his knife towards the camera. A Wide shot following the knives POV in Slow-Mo companied by the voice of a female opera singer for a dramatic effect.

Next is a MS to an extreme close up with the camera tilting down when the third redneck falls to the ground. Cut to a low angled coloured wide shot of Mallory jumping on the redneck lying on the floor´s POV. Cut to B/W. the action shifts dramatically between B/W and full colour and the angles are shifting intensely between high and low, canted and Dutch tilting, MS and wide shots, Cross-cutting and parallel.

Next shot is a canted medium-wide shot to MS of Mickey taking a bite of his pie. Cut to a wide shot tracking Mallory. Back to a wide shot of Mickey emptying the cash register. Next is a Dutch tilted low angled side shot of Mallory shouting. MS of Mallory leaving the frame. Wide shot with Dutch tilt of Mickey. Mallory enters the frame. She jumps Mickey. He spins her while the camera also spins. She starts shouting pointing down the right of the frame. The camera tracks out to where she was pointing. A wide shot of the waitress trying to escape. The camera is canted and tracking the waitress as she moves further back into the diner.

A tilted wide shot where Mallory is playing a sick version of Eeny, meeny, miny, moe to see who gets to live to tell the tale of Mickey and Mallory. The camera is now cutting back and forth MS of Mallory´s fingers POV and the waitress and the cowboys POV. The cracking sound of the teapot about to burst adds more suspense to this scene. MS from Mickey´s POV. He shoots the waitress and the squidling sound of the teapot stops.

Next shot is also from Mickey´s POV: A MWS of the Cowboy with his hands in the air. MCU of Mickey blowing the smoke off his gun, which gives the viewer an American vibe. Back to a MS of the cowboy. Cut to a MS of Mickey and Mallory from the cowboys POV walking towards him. Cut to CU followed by ECU of the cowboy. Repeated shots. Mallory´s talking. Camera tracks to Mallory and back to the cowboy. Follows the dialogue. Cut to a MS of all three of them. The camera zooms continuously in and out. And the shots shift between Close ups of the cowboy and MS of Mickey lifting Mallory and spinning her around.

The image switches from B/W to colour and from there the scene is romanticised. Low angled MS of Mickey and Mallory kissing and dancing. The lights are dimmed and a romantic song starts playing. Like they´re the only people in the world. The light is red and glowing and the scene ends with fireworks on the wall which is probably showing their imagination of it all. Could the colours represent two realities?

 

#4.1 Sound Design

 

While reading Sound Design, the first point that intrigued me was how Alten described sound as an emotional, perceptual and physical force. Sound can excite feeling, convey meaning, and, if it is loud enough, resonate the body. Sound is everywhere. Sound is attention demanding (Alten 1994).

Alten touches on how we speak of “watching” movies. It is true that we in a way take sound for granted. But not fully. Personally, and for as long as I can remember, sound and music has played an important role in my everyday life. I´ve always been aware of the power of sound. When it comes to movies, to me, the sound is as important as the visual part. I´m more scared of listening to movies than I am watching them. Up till this day, I´ve sat through countless off horror and thriller films with my hands over my ears in a desperate attempt to block all sound from coming in. But a funny thing is; I hardly ever cover my eyes, because without the sound the images don’t scare me.

Sound affects the mood or feeling of words and sentences (Alten 1994). That´s another thing I am intrigued by and always keep in mind while writing stories; The aural mood of words and sentences. The sounds in each word not only contribute to the overall meaning but are contained in the other words to enhance further the mood of the line.

As an example, Alten demonstrates a line written by the poet Robert Lowell “Waves crashed against the rocks” and “Waves hit upon the boulders.” These two sentences mean the same thing, but they sound completely different. The first sentence I would definitely think to use, because it has more power to it, exactly what I associate with waves and rocks. The second one would never even crossed my mind because the words don’t impact me as much. As a native Norwegian, I find my knowledge of the English vocabulary and phraseology quite restricted. Because of that I easily fall into the trap of using clichés. Something that I would rather avoid.

References:

Alten, S. Audio in media, (p. 5-12, p. 266-286). Belmont: Wadsworth, 1994.

#6 Deconstructing the Travis visits Betsy Scene from Taxi Driver 2.0

This is a re-deconstruction of the scene where Travis (Robert De Niro) visits Betsy (Cybill Shepherd), from the movie Taxi Driver directed by Martin Scorsese.

The first shot is a two second CU of Travis sitting in the taxi. He looks determined.

The next frame is a tracking shot which follows Travis stepping out of the Taxi, crossing the road and walking into an office building. He´s wearing a red jacket, the same colour as the Palantine campaign colour and the banner outside. The colour makes Travis stand out. Maybe he put it on to impress Betsy? Camera zoom when Travis reach the door.

MCU inside the office. Travis is walking towards the camera. It´s shot slightly from the side. The low camera angle emphasises Travis´ intention. He seems persistent.

Next frame is a fast tracking shot with Travis POV of Betsy and her colleague Tom sitting on her desk zooming into an MCU of Betsy at the end shot.

Travis consists on volunteering with Betsy when Tom asks him to please come with him.

The dialogue between Betsy and Travis goes on with constant over the shoulder shots. This continues until the end of the clip. Travis body language is open and overly eager as he leans over with both palms planted on Betsy´s desk.  She is seated at her desk the whole time, therefore the camera angle is low and the over the shoulder shots from Betsy´s POV makes it look like Travis controls the outcome of the conversation.

In the background, one can see that Tom is ease dropping in a wide shot. That´s the only time the frame makes a dramatic change.

At 1:25, when Travis tells Betsy he drives a Taxi and can´t work night, her body language changes and she pulls slightly away from him. Travis tells Betsy she looks lonely and that it looks like she could use a friend when really it is Travis who is lonely. Eventually, Travis lands a date with Betsy.

They shake hands. Tom enters the MCU frame. He doesn´t look happy with what just went down. The scene ends with a soothing jazzy tune. The final shot is a tracking MLS shot of Travis walking past her building.

 

Given what I learned from making Lenny while deconstructing this scene over again, it felt very similar to my first go.

#4 The Director and the Actor

As the French filmmaker Jean Renoir put it; Some actors are very intelligent, but it is not necessarily with their intelligence that they act (Mackendrick 2004). I agree the actor or the actress don´t need to be intelligent to act. It´s highly more important that they´re talented.

Another interesting point, Mackendrick writes, it that if an actor is fully conscious of the film-making process, his performance might be too premeditated and not spontaneous enough. I think there is some truth to that. Not that I have ever acted professionally, but I can imagine worrying or thinking about the technical aspect of the production might restrain you from acting out your full potential.

How does the director get an actor to do what she wants? What intrigued me most reading Mackendrick´s `The Director and the Actor´, was the point that as a director you´ve already failed if you demonstrate to the actor by acting the role yourself, by reading the line of dialogue for the actor to mimic or by performing the gesture so that the actor can copy it.

Blinded by preconceptions, you may well have closed your mind to what the actor is able to contribute (Mackendrick 2004). Imagine being a director, picture in your mind the movie you´ve worked so hard on planning. You have a vision; you know how you want to do this. But things change. Not everything works out as planned and you need to adapt. There´s no point sticking to a plan that is not doable when the actress clearly knows what she´s doing.

Mackendrick has some valid points. I think it´s obvious that the director must have respect for his actors. To get the actor to do what you need I think it is important to listen to their ideas and most of all be humble. Mackendrick writes that infinite patience is necessary, as the director’s job is to gradually jockey the actor into thinking up what you´ve already thought up.

 

References:

Mackendrick, A. On film-making: an introduction to the craft of the director, (p. 179- 194). London: Faber and Faber, 2004.

 

#1 Haiku Abstract Exercise

To me, this was the most intriguing of the exercises we´ve had so far. Possibly because there´s no rules to abstract.

We weren´t fully aware of what we were going to make when we started this exercise. It was broken into different parts, over weeks. It consisted of video, SFX, and a Haiku, in form of a voice over.

Our first quest was to head out and capture dappled, diffused, reflected and refracted light. It was right before sundown so we managed to get some pretty good shots. Because no one knew that this footage was meant to merge together with other elements, there were no worries about getting a particular shot which would fit perfectly with the SFX and the Haiku. It freed our minds and I guess that was the point of it all.

For the SFX I experimented with recordings of wind, chains swaying, traffic lights, elevator sounds, galloping footsteps etc.

We didn´t know till after the Haiku was recorded that we were to combine all the pieces. It was a fun experiment and I think that if people knew what we were going to use the footage and SFX for it would have turned out quite differently.

An idea popped up in my head while going through the footage and SFX during the post-production: Using the footage off dappled light in water and combine it with industrial sound. Normally, water is associated with calmness and relaxation but I wanted to break that illusion. When pieced together with the repeating hectic sound of the traffic lights it creates a contrast between nature and industrial. With the footage, I mostly experimented with layovers and different opacities. For the Haiku, I wanted it to be presented as the characters’ inner monologue.